G3 launches G3-Fireshield Technology, a graphene-based line of components for the reduction of battery fires

Global Graphene Group (G3) logo imageGlobal Graphene Group (G3), the holding company of Angstron Materials and Nanotek Instruments, has announced G3-Fireshield Technology – a suite of next generation battery components to dramatically reduce the risk of fire occurrences in EVs, portable electronics, and a range of other devices.

G3 states that this breakthrough is the first of its kind to overcome the intrinsic flammability problems associated with multiple battery material components. G3 explains that a conventional Li-ion battery is made up of three primary components: a negative electrode, a separator soaked in electrolyte solution, and a positive electrode. At elevated temperatures, brought on by mechanical, electrical or thermal abuse, each of these components undergoes chemical and/or structural changes that release energy from the cell in harmful ways.

Rice University team creates 3D objects from graphene foam

Rice University scientists have developed a simple way to create conductive, 3D objects made of graphene foam. The resulting objects may offer new possibilities for energy storage and flexible electronic sensor applications, according to Rice chemist Prof. James Tour.

Rice team creates 3D objects from graphene foam image

The technique is an extension of groundbreaking work by the Tour lab that produced the first laser-induced graphene (LIG) in 2014 by heating inexpensive polyimide plastic sheets with a laser. The laser burns halfway through the plastic and turns the top into graphene that remains attached to the bottom half. LIG can be made in macroscale patterns at room temperature.

Researchers use graphene to increase the sensitivity of diagnostic devices

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have used graphene to increase the sensitivity of diagnostic devices, in particular those used to monitor and treat HIV. The team combined a trick of DNA engineering which involves an engineered piece of DNA called a hairpin, with biosensors, increasing the sensitivity of the sensors by a factor of 50,000 in less than an hour.

Researchers used graphene to increase the sensitivity of diagnostic devices image

The biosensorsare made with graphene, and so can be used as an extremely sensitive way of detecting biological signals, measuring the current that flows through graphene surface in the presence of biomolecules. When DNA or RNA molecules bind to the graphene, it produces a big change in the conductivity of the atomically thin material, allowing the researchers to detect infections and to measure viral loads.

Graphene Flagship team uses GO to stretch the limits of gas separation

Researchers associated with the Graphene Flagship have reported overcoming the theoretical limiting performance of membranes in gas separation. This collaborative research from CNR, University of Bologna and Graphene-XT has potential applications in hydrogen purification and carbon capture and storage.

Graphene Flagship team uses graphene to improve gas separation image

The team explains that polymer-based membranes for gas separation have a trade-off between high gas permeability and high gas selectivity, the so-called Robeson upper bound. By combining individual graphene oxide sheets with polymer spacers, in a sandwich style structure, the researchers have been able to overcome this limit, separating gas quickly and efficiently.

Graphene "carpets" found to boost neural activity

A study led by SISSA (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati), in association with the University of Antwerp (Belgium), the University of Trieste and the Institute of Science and Technology of Barcelona (Spain), reports the phenomenon of ion trapping by "graphene carpets" and its effect on the communication between neurons. The researchers observed an increase in the activity of nerve cells grown on a single layer of graphene. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches, they have shown that the phenomenon is due to the ability of the material to 'trap' several ions present in the surrounding environment on its surface, modulating its composition.

Graphene carpets enhance neural communication image

The researchers analyzed the behavior of neurons grown on a single layer of graphene, observing a strengthening in their activity. Through theoretical and experimental approaches, the researchers have shown that such behavior is due to reduced ion mobility, in particular of potassium, to the neuron-graphene interface. This phenomenon is commonly called ion trapping, already understood at the theoretical level, but observed experimentally for the first time only now.

Haydale says its FY2018 revenues will be 15-20% higher than FY2017, lower than what it expected earlier

Haydale logoHaydale announced that the company's revenues for FY2018 (which will end on June 2018) are expected to be around 15-20% higher the revenues generated in FY2017 (£3.0 million). This excludes grant income of around £0.85 million in FY2018.

This is lower than what the company expected earlier, and the company's loss will be about the same as in FY2017. At the end of May 2018, Haydale had £5.6 million in cash and equivalents.

XFNANO: Graphene and graphene-like materials since 2009XFNANO: Graphene and graphene-like materials since 2009