Researchers find the exact balance in which graphene coatings can promote hydrogen evolution reaction

A collaboration led by the University of Tsukuba has recently optimized an approach to increase the stability of catalysts used in the hydrogen evolution reaction without significantly sacrificing activity. The team found that coating catalyst nanoparticles with an optimal number of layers of graphene raised nanoparticle durability while allowing the nanoparticles to retain their catalytic activity. The study was reported in ACS Energy Letters.

"We optimized the balance between the number of graphene layers coating the nanoparticles and their catalytic activity," study first author Kailong Hu says. "To do this, we had to precisely control the number of graphene layers coating the nanoparticles, which we achieved by carefully regulating the deposition time of graphene on the nanoparticles."

Graphene enables novel thermal camouflage system

Researchers from Bilkent University and Izmir Institute of Technology in Turkey, MIT and University of Manchester have developed a system that can reconfigure its thermal appearance to blend in with varying temperatures in a matter of seconds.

Graphene thermal camouflage system image

Previously, scientists have tried to develop thermal camouflage for various applications, but they have encountered problems such as slow response speed, lack of adaptability to different temperatures and the requirement for rigid materials. The team in this research wanted to develop a fast, rapidly adaptable and flexible material.

UCLA team designs a novel type of graphene-based photodetector

Engineers from the UCLA have Used graphene to design a new type of photodetector that can work with more types of light than its current state-of-the-art counterparts. The device also has superior sensing and imaging capabilities.

UCLA's novel graphene-based photodetector image

photodetectors' versatility and usefulness depend largely on three factors: their operating speed, their sensitivity to lower levels of light, and how much of the spectrum they can sense. Typically, when engineers have improved a photodetector’s capabilities in any one of those areas, at least one of the two other capabilities has been diminished. The photodetector designed by the UCLA team has major improvements in all three areas – it operates across a broad range of light, processes images more quickly and is more sensitive to low levels of light than current technology.

Graphene forms electrically-charged crinkles when compressed

Researchers from Brown University have discovered yet another peculiar and potentially useful property of graphene, that could be useful in guiding nanoscale self-assembly or in analyzing DNA or other biomolecules.

Graphene forms electrically-charged crinkles when compressed image

Their new study demonstrates mathematically what happens to stacks of graphene sheets under slight lateral compression—a gentle squeeze from their sides. Rather than forming smooth, gently sloping warps and wrinkles across the surface, the researchers found that layered graphene forms sharp, saw-tooth ridges that turn apparently have interesting electrical properties.

Zenyatta raises over $500,000 USD in private placement

Zenyatta logoZenyatta Ventures has announced the closing of the private placement announced earlier this year. Approximately $712,000 CAD (around $535,200 USD) was raised in respect of the equity offering.

The funds will be used for general expenses of the Company, including the advancement of the Albany project, initiating an Environmental Assessment, and other corporate expenses.

Graphematech and Add North 3D develop novel graphene-enhanced 3D printing filaments

A collaboration between two innovative material technology startups Graphmatech and Add North 3D (a Swedish 3D materials developer specialized in FDM materials) has developed novel conductive Aros Graphene-based filaments for 3D printing. This may open up many new different 3D-printing applications such as thermal management components, circuit boards and efficient electromagnetic and radio frequency shielding.

The recently developed 3D-printing technology based on Graphematech's Aros Graphene may grant the ability to control the exact level of conductivity of the filament. The new filaments will now be optimized and go through beta testing with a reference group before it is expected to reach the market in 6-12 month.

Talga Resources reports breakthrough on its graphene-infused concrete project

Australia-based advanced materials company Talga Resources has reported high levels of electrical conductivity in concrete by using an additive developed from the Company’s graphene-graphite research and development laboratory in the UK.

Talga reports advancements of graphene-enhanced concrete project image(L) Talga concrete sample after melting 5cm depth of ice from 9v power. (R) Conceptual underfloor heating/road application.

The reported breakthrough offers substantial potential in existing and emerging industrial applications, particularly as concrete is the world’s largest construction material by volume. Talga shared information gathered from tests that show that the graphene-enhanced concrete is highly electrically conductive - attaining 0.05 ohm.cm volume resistivity.

First Graphene to work with newGen on graphene-enhanced products for the mining services industry

First Graphene logo imageFirst Graphene has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with newGen Group (WA-based mining industry supplier, providing liners for the leading iron ore producers, including BHP, RIO and Fortescue) for the development of graphene-enhanced products (primarily polyurethane liners) for the mining services industry.

Having established its graphene production facility at Henderson, FGR’s primary focus now is working with a number of manufacturers in a range of industries to demonstrate the benefits that graphene can offer to their product ranges. The newly entered agreement involves adding graphene to polyurethane liners and ground engaging tools used in the mining industry. The Project Equipment used in the mining industry is frequently modified with the installation of polyurethane liners to protect them from excessive abrasion, and these liners need to be replaced at regular intervals.

First Graphene and Flinders University form a new company to commercialize VFD technology

First Graphene logo imageFirst Graphene is collaborating with Flinders University to launch 2D Fluidics - a company that will aim to commercialize the Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD). 2D Fluidics is 50% owned by FGR and 50% by Flinders University’s newly named Flinders Institute for NanoScale Science and Technology.

The VFD was invented by the Flinders Institute for NanoScale Science and Technology’s Professor Colin Raston and enables new approaches to producing a wide range of materials such as graphene and sliced carbon nanotubes. The key intellectual property used by 2D Fluidics comprises two patents around the production of carbon nanomaterials, assigned by Flinders University.

Calling out to graphene companies in need of funds

Are you looking to raise funds for your graphene business? Graphene-Info may have the perfect solution! Stay tuned for more details on our soon-to-be-launched platform for graphene equity crowdfunding.

Graphene crowdfunding - investor outreach

As we are working on the finishing touches of this platform, we are calling out to interested companies who'd like to hear more and start the process early. Contact us for more info!