Article last updated on: Jan 23, 2019

Graphene is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb-like pattern. Graphene is considered to be the world's thinnest, strongest and most conductive material - to both electricity and heat. All this properties are exciting researchers and businesses around the world - as graphene has the potential the revolutionize entire industries - in the fields of electricity, conductivity, energy generation, batteries, sensors and more.

Mechanical strength

Graphene is the world's strongest material, and so can be used to enhance the strength of other materials. Dozens of researches have demonstrated that adding even a trade amount of graphene to plastics, metals or other materials can make these materials much stronger - or lighter (as you can use less amount of material to achieve the same strength).

applications of composites image

Such graphene-enhanced composite materials can find uses in aerospace, building materials, mobile devices, and many other applications.

Thermal applications

Graphene is the world's most conductive material to heat. As graphene is also strong and light, it means that it is a great material to make heat-spreading solutions, such as heat sinks. This could be useful in both microelectronics (for example to make LED lighting more efficient and longer lasting) and also in larger applications - for example thermal foils for mobile devices.

graphene-bulb-demonstration-image



Energy storage

Because graphene is the world's thinnest material, it is also the material with the highest surface-area to volume ratio. This makes graphene a very promising material to be used in batteries and supercapacitors. Graphene may enable devices that can store more energy - and charge faster, too. Graphene can also be used to enhance fuel-cells.

Coatings ,sensors, electronics and more

Graphene has a lot of other promising applications: anti-corrosion coatings and paints, efficient and precise sensors, faster and efficient electronics, flexible displays, efficient solar panels, faster DNA sequencing, drug delivery, and more.

Graphene is such a great and basic building block that it seems that any industry can benefit from this new material. Time will tell where graphene will indeed make an impact - or whether other new materials will be more suitable.

The latest Graphene Application news:

Investigating the bending stiffness of graphene yields surprising results

New research by scientists at the University of Illinois combines atomic-scale experimentation with computer modeling to determine how much energy it would take in order to bend multilayer graphene - a question that has eluded scientists since graphene was first isolated.

"The bending stiffness of a material is one of its most fundamental mechanical properties," said Edmund Han, a materials science and engineering graduate student and study co-author. "Even though we have been studying graphene for two decades, we have yet to resolve this very fundamental property. The reason is that different research groups have come up with different answers that span across orders of magnitude."

Graphene and gold sensing platform may help fight neurological disorders

A Rutgers University-led team has created what it is calling a "better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and other neurological disorders".

Biosensor consists of an array of ultrathin graphene layers and gold structures image

The development, which is based on a graphene and gold platform and high-tech imaging system, monitors the progress of stem cells by detecting genetic material (RNA) involved in turning such cells into brain cells (neurons).

Korean researchers find that stress may have a useful effect on graphene

A team of researchers at the Institute of Basic Science in Korea recently released the results of a study that indicates stress stimulates further reactions in graphene and may actually be beneficial for its functionality.

The team found that the crystal structure of copper substrates, which are usually used for graphene synthesis, affects the addition of functionalities to graphene. Using different crystal structures such as ‘Copper 001′, ‘Copper 110′ and ‘Copper 111′ as substrates, the additional reactions of the graphene’s functions were observed and the reaction was found to be the fastest and most uniform on copper 111 substrates.

Directa Plus and Skanska launch trial of graphene-enhanced asphalt

Directa Plus logoDirecta Plus announced the start of a trial of re-surfacing a section of a UK road in Curbridge, Oxfordshire with materials containing its G+ graphene substance. Thew trial will be in collaboration with Skanska, the leading Sweden-based project development and construction group. Directa Plus partnered with Iterchimica, an Italy-based leader in products that enhance asphalt performance, to carry out the trial.

For the trial, the companies will refurbish the two upper layers of a 750m-long section of road, comparing asphalt concrete containing the graphene super modifier. New technologies such as the super modifier had the potential to vastly improve the quality of road surfaces throughout Europe and the wider world, according to Directa Plus.

Talga launches commercial-scale trial of graphene coating on ocean-going cargo vessel

Talga Resources, advanced battery anode materials and graphene additives provider, has announced a commercial-scale trial of a graphene-enhanced coating applied to a 33,000 tonne container ship.

Talga starts trial of graphene coating on cargo ship image The 33,000 tonne 225m long cargo ship “Algarrobo” leaves dry dock after re-painting a 700m2 section with Talphene-enhanced primer coating

The 700m2 coating of the cargo vessel’s hull is part of advanced testing of Talga’s functionalized graphene (Talphene) additive as a performance booster for existing commercial marine coatings.