Article last updated on: Jan 29, 2019

What is a foam?

A foam is a substance in which gas is trapped in a liquid or a solid in pockets. There are many types of foams - for example, those used by firefighters (mostly to combat burning oils). A bread is also, at least formally, a type of foam.

Graphene Foams

Graphene foams are usually made by growing graphene using a CVD process on a 3D metal foam (structure). The metal is then removed which leaves the graphene 3D foam.

A graphene foam is strong and conductive and useful for many applications - sensors, purification/absorption materials - and more.

Graphene foams are somewhat similar to graphene aerogels, in which the liquid part of the gel is replaced by a gas (usually air).

Graphene foams are now available commercially, contact us for details.



The latest graphene foam news:

The Graphene Light project recieves funds to produce prototype devices

In May 2017 we reported the the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Wroclaw, Poland) developed a new efficient white light source that uses graphene foam excitated by a continuous-wave laser. We have seen a demonstration of the technology at IDTechEx 2019 (see video below).

We have recently spoken with Prof. Krzysztof Piech who updated us on the project's process. Prof. Piech tells us that the research team received a grant of around $130,000 to develop the technology, and are expecting to soon receive a $270,000 grant that will enable the production of a series of prototypes. We hope to update once these prototypes can be demonstrated.

The Graphene Light project demonstrates its laser graphene foam lighting device

In May 2017 we reported on a new project at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Wroclaw, Poland) that developed a new efficient white light source that uses graphene foam excitated by a continuous-wave laser.

The project is still in progress, and the researchers demonstrated the technology at IDTechEx Graphene & 2D Materials Europe 2019 earlier this month, as can be seen in our video above.

Graphene-based foam maintains texture at extreme temperatures

Researchers from Nankai University in China and Rice University in the U.S. have developed a type of graphene-based foam that retains its texture when exposed to extremely cold temperatures.

Graphene foam maintains texture at extreme temperatures imageStructure of the 3D graphene foam

The researchers note that almost all materials become more brittle and stiffer when exposed to very cold temperatures, often leading to loss of strength. In this new work, the researchers sought to find a material that would spring back after being crushed while exposed to extreme temperatures. To that end, they turned to graphene as a possible solution.

Graphene foam to potentially offer better treatment for joint diseases and eliminate the need for joint replacement

A new study out of Boise State University in the U.S may one day lead to new graphene-based treatments for osteoarthritis, potentially preventing the need for joint replacement.

The study investigates the compressive mechanical properties of graphene foam – soft tissue composites. Previous studies have shown graphene foam’s compatibility with chondrogenic cell lines for cartilage tissue engineering. This is reportedly the first study to focus on the viscoelastic behavior of the engineered tissue to test the functionality of the grown cartilage.

Rice University team creates 3D objects from graphene foam

Rice University scientists have developed a simple way to create conductive, 3D objects made of graphene foam. The resulting objects may offer new possibilities for energy storage and flexible electronic sensor applications, according to Rice chemist Prof. James Tour.

Rice team creates 3D objects from graphene foam image

The technique is an extension of groundbreaking work by the Tour lab that produced the first laser-induced graphene (LIG) in 2014 by heating inexpensive polyimide plastic sheets with a laser. The laser burns halfway through the plastic and turns the top into graphene that remains attached to the bottom half. LIG can be made in macroscale patterns at room temperature.