Article last updated on: Jan 29, 2019

What is a foam?

A foam is a substance in which gas is trapped in a liquid or a solid in pockets. There are many types of foams - for example, those used by firefighters (mostly to combat burning oils). A bread is also, at least formally, a type of foam.

Graphene Foams

Graphene foams are usually made by growing graphene using a CVD process on a 3D metal foam (structure). The metal is then removed which leaves the graphene 3D foam.

A graphene foam is strong and conductive and useful for many applications - sensors, purification/absorption materials - and more.

Graphene foams are somewhat similar to graphene aerogels, in which the liquid part of the gel is replaced by a gas (usually air).

Graphene foams are now available commercially, contact us for details.



The latest graphene foam news:

Researchers develop the world's first light-driven speaker using a 3D graphene sponge

A research team from the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland and Sapienza University in Rome developed a new loud speaker that is driven by a light signal - and without electricity. The idea is to use modulated light that shines on a 3D graphene sponge. The audio is achieved via a highly-efficient photo-mechanism.

The researchers say that unlike conventional loudspeakers, this high-fidelity photo-speaker does not rely on vibrations to produce the sound - and it does not need any type of electrical connection or complicated system for sound generation. Using an optical pulse train, this loudspeaker allows a completely digital operation for frequencies from acoustic to ultrasound.

Rice team's CNT-reinforced graphene foam is conductive and strong

Researchers at Rice University have constructed a graphene foam, reinforced by carbon nanotubes, that can support more than 3,000 times its own weight and bounce back to its original height. In addition, its shape and size are easily controlled - which the team demonstrated by creating a screw-shaped piece of the material.

The 3D structures were created from a powdered nickel catalyst, surfactant-wrapped multiwall nanotubes and sugar as a carbon source. The materials were mixed and the water evaporated; the resulting pellets were pressed into a steel die and then heated in a chemical vapor deposition furnace, which turned the available carbon into graphene. After further processing to remove remnants of nickel, the result was an all-carbon foam in the shape of the die, in this case a screw. The team said the method will be easy to scale up.

Graphene oxide-based foam to clean dirty water

Researchers at Washington University have managed to use graphene oxide sheets to create a biofoam that can transform dirty water into drinking water. Their hope is that in countries where there is a lot of sunlight, it'll be possible to take dirty water, evaporate it using this material, and collect fresh water.

This new method combines bacteria-produced cellulose and graphene oxide to form a bi-layered biofoam. The production process is said to be extremely simple, and the nanoscale cellulose fiber network produced by bacteria has excellent ability to move the water from the bulk to the evaporative surface while minimizing the heat coming down. The material is a bi-layered structure with light-absorbing graphene oxide filled nanocellulose at the top and pristine nanocellulose at the bottom. When suspended this on water, the water is actually able to reach the top surface where evaporation happens.

Graphene to regenerate 3D tissues and organs for implantation into the human body

A team of researchers from Boise State University have conducted a study that focuses on demonstrating the suitability of graphene foam (3D version of graphene) as a scaffold for growing functional muscle tissue. In the future, researchers hope that the unique properties of graphene and graphene foam can be used to regenerate 3-dimensional tissues and organs for implantation into the human body.

According to the team, the study demonstrated that extra cellular matrix proteins on graphene foam can enhance the differentiation of pluripotent C2C12 myoblasts,and in addition it was possible to verify muscle functionality by using the graphene foam itself as an electrode to stimulate the tissue.

Graphene 3D Lab Introduces a new product: Graphene Flex Foam

Graphene 3D Lab has announced Graphene Flex Foam, a new commercial product that will be available through Graphene Laboratories’ e-commerce site, Graphene Supermarket. The new product is described as a Multilayer Freestanding Flexible Graphene Foam, that brings together a conductive elastomer composite with ultra-light graphene foam.

The foam, a highly conductive 3D chemical vapor deposition (CVD), together with the composite, brings together the best of several worlds of graphene usage. As a flexible foam, the material is both lightweight and reconfigurable, adding to ease of use and handling, with a porous structure. The Graphene Flex Foam could be used in conjunction with other graphene-related materials–such as Graphene 3D Lab’s filament offerings–in the creation of electronics and other conductive products.