Article last updated on: Jan 29, 2019

The latest graphene ink news:

Versarien to develop graphene-enhanced sportswear with Asian partner

Versarien LogoVersarien recently shared it has signed a letter of intent with its textile collaboration partner to launch sportswear containing Versarien's graphene ink technology.

Versarien said the letter is non-binding, covering the intention of Versarien and the undisclosed Asia-headquartered company partner to "enter into a formal commercial relationship regarding an initial launch of high performance sportswear".

Researchers produce graphene by mixing oxidized graphite with bacteria

Researchers at the U.S-based University of Rochester, along with colleagues at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, have designed a way to produce graphene materials using a novel technique: mixing oxidized graphite with bacteria. Their method is reportedly a more cost-efficient, time-saving, and environmentally friendly way of producing graphene materials versus those produced chemically, and could lead to the creation of innovative computer technologies and medical equipment.

Bacterially-made graphene is faster, cheaper and better imageFrom left to right:graphite (Gr), graphene oxide (GO), microbially‐reduced graphene oxide (mrGO), and chemically‐reduced graphene oxide (crGO)

"For real applications you need large amounts," says Anne S. Meyer, an associate professor of biology at the University of Rochester. "Producing these bulk amounts is challenging and typically results in graphene that is thicker and less pure. This is where our work came in". In order to produce larger quantities of graphene materials, Meyer and her colleagues started with a vial of graphite. They exfoliated the graphite-shedding the layers of material-to produce graphene oxide (GO), which they then mixed with the bacteria Shewanella. They let the beaker of bacteria and precursor materials sit overnight, during which time the bacteria reduced the GO to a graphene material.



Graphene Flagship partners launch rocket to test the possibilities of printing graphene inks in space

Graphene Flagship partners, Université Libre de Bruxelles, University of Pisa and the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC), recently launched The Materials Science Experiment Rocket (MASER) into space. The objective is to test the printing of graphene patterns on silicon substrates in zero gravity conditions.

New graphene experiment launches into space image

The experiment aims to test the possibilities of printing graphene inks in space. Studying the different self-assembly modes of graphene into functional patterns in zero-gravity will enable the fabrication of graphene electronic devices during long-term space missions, as well as help understand fundamental properties of graphene printing on Earth. This mission is also a first step towards the investigation of graphene for radiation shielding purposes, an essential requirement of manned space exploration.

San Diego team creates LIG graphene composites for printed, stretchable wearables

Researchers at Joseph Wang's Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics at UC San Diego demonstrated the synthesis of high-performance stretchable graphene ink using a facile, scalable, and low-cost laser induction method for the synthesis of the graphene component.

The processing steps for screen-printed flexible supercapacitor fabricated from laser-induced graphene ink imageThe processing steps for screen-printed flexible supercapacitor fabricated from laser-induced graphene ink

As a proof-of-concept, the researchers fabricated a stretchable micro-supercapacitor (S-MSC) demonstrating high capacitance. This is said to be the first example of using laser-induced graphene in the form of a powder preparation of graphene-based inks and subsequently for use in screen-printing of S-MSC.

Grafoid launches a new company to focus on graphene 3D Printing

Canadian graphene developer Grafoid announced that it launched a new company, called Grafprint3D, to develop and produce 3D printing materials based on Grafoid's MesoGraf graphene - although Grafprint3D's current materials are actually graphene inks for screen printing and inkjet printing and not 3D printed ones.

Grafprint3D graphene inks photo (May 2019)

Grafoid says that initially the new company will focus on wearable device fabrication with biocompatible polymers, biomaterial substrates for cell therapy engineering research, and rapid product prototyping with printable advanced nanomaterials.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!