Company: 
The University of Manchester

Applications are invited for a Research Associate in Graphene Biochemical Engineering within the Nanomedicine Laboratory at the University of Manchester. Position holder will contribute to the research programme of the Nanomedicine Lab in the development of research to investigate the development of surface-modified graphene and other 2D materials for applications on the interface with living cells and tissues. The position holder will be expected to contribute to the synthesis, functionalization, characterization and use of various graphene-based materials (graphene oxide, exfoliated graphene, other 2D material) in collaboration with other researchers within the Nanomedicine Lab, at the University of Manchester, as well as other external laboratories.

Applicants should hold a PhD in chemistry, chemical engineering, materials science, biochemistry, or equivalent. They should also have demonstrable previous experience in the chemistry and functionalization of carbon or 2D nanomaterials (preferably carbon nanotubes and graphene) with different cell types and tissue models. You should be able to interact effectively with researchers from a range of other disciplines to contribute to the programme of research.

Evidence of a developing research publication track record would be advantageous.

The Institute of Inflammation & Repair is committed to promoting equality and diversity, including the Athena SWAN charter for promoting women’s careers in STEMM subjects (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine) in higher education. The Institute received a Bronze Award in 2013 for their commitment to the representation of women in the workplace and we particularly welcome applications from women for this post. Appointment will always be made on merit. For further information, please visit

Location: 
UK
Contact details: 
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/ANI829/research-associate-in-graphene-biochemical-engineering/
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