Superconductivity in bilayer graphene can be turned on or off with a voltage change

An international team of researchers from Spain, the U.S., China and Japan has found that superconductivity in bilayer graphene can be turned on or off with a small voltage change, increasing its usefulness for electronic devices. This follows previous findings regarding twisted bilayer graphene and its ability to exhibit alternating superconducting and insulating regions.

"It's kind of a holy grail of physics to create a material that has superconductivity at room temperature," University of Texas at Austin physicist Allan MacDonald said. "So that's part of the motivation of this work: to understand high-temperature superconductivity better."

Haydale launches functionalized graphene prepreg for lightning strike protection

Haydale logoHaydale has launched a range of graphene-enhanced prepreg materials for lightning-strike protection, utilizing functionalized graphene to improve the electrical conductivity.

The material has been developed in collaboration with Airbus UK, BAE Systems, GE Aviation and Element Materials Technology Warwick, within the NATEP-supported GraCELs project where the first iterations of materials were developed and subjected to lighting strike tests. The consortium is now looking to manufacture a demonstrator component using the materials developed to establish composite manufacturing protocols as a showcase part for commercial purposes.

The "magic angle" for making graphene a superconductor may be less stringent than previously thought

Researchers at The Ohio State University, in collaboration with University of Texas, Dallas scientists and the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan, have found that graphene is more likely to become a superconductor than originally thought possible.

Finding the “magic angle” to create a new superconductor image(A) Schematic diagram of device geometry. (B) Schematic diagram of moiré superlattice formed by the twisted graphene layers. Image from Science Advances

“Graphene by itself can conduct energy, as a normal metal is conductive, but it is only recently that we learned it can also be a superconductor, by making a so-called ‘magic angle’ – twisting a second layer of graphene on top of the first,” said Jeanie Lau, a professor of physics at Ohio State and co-author of the paper. “And that opens possibilities for additional research to see if we can make this material work in the real world.”

Researchers reach graphene-based junctions that are both electrically and mechanically stable

A research team jointly led by University of Warwick and EMPA has tackled a challenging issue of stability and reproducibility in working with graphene, that meant that graphene-based junctions were either mechanically stable or electrically stable but not both at the same time.

Researchers tackle a known limitation of graphene junctions imageCredit: University of Warwick

Graphene and graphene like molecules are attractive choices for electronic components in molecular devices, but have proven very challenging to use in large scale production of molecular devices that will work and be robust at room temperatures. The joint research team from the University of Warwick, EMPA and Lancaster and Bern Universities has reached both electrical and mechanical stability in graphene-based junctions.

Graphene discovery could help develop room temperature superconductors

A research team led by Rutgers University has discovered that in the presence of a moiré pattern in graphene, electrons organize themselves into stripes, like soldiers in formation. The team's findings could help in the search for quantum materials, such as superconductors, that would work at room temperature. Such materials would dramatically reduce energy consumption by making power transmission and electronic devices more efficient.

Electrons organize in lines in magic layer graphene imageLeft: image shows a moiré pattern in "magic angle" twisted bilayer graphene. Right: Scanning tunneling charge spectroscopy, shows correlated electrons. Credit: Rutgers University

"Our findings provide an essential clue to the mystery connecting a form of graphene, called twisted bilayer graphene, to superconductors that could work at room temperature," said senior author Eva Y. Andrei, Board of Governors professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University–New Brunswick.