Log9 Materials bets on graphene-based aluminium fuel cells for future EVs

India-based Log9 Materials, believes that the key to better EVs is to focus on energy-generation, instead of energy storage. Log9 Materials says that a car powered by aluminium fuel cells can have a range of 1000 km post which the aluminium plates can be replaced within minutes.

According to Log9, aluminium fuel cells would primarily use three components – aluminium, water, and carbon in the form of graphene. In simple words, there’s water between layers of graphene, and when aluminium comes in contact with water, it corrodes – releasing energy. Log9 explains that procuring raw materials for aluminium fuel cells is much simpler than those for lithium-ion batteries which use lithium and cobalt, so manufacturing cost can be considerably lower for aluminium fuel cells than lithium-ion battery packs.

New graphene-based lithium-air battery may enable longer-running electric cars

Researchers at the Korean Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) have fabricated an electrode using nickel cobalt sulphide nanoflakes on a sulfur-doped graphene, leading to a long-life battery with high discharge capacity. This improvement of lithium-air batteries' performance may bring us a step closer to electric cars that can use oxygen to run longer before they need to recharge.

"The driving distance of electric cars running on lithium-ion batteries is about 300 kilometers," says chemist Sangaraju Shanmugam of DGIST. "This means it's difficult to make a round trip between Seoul and Busan on these batteries. This has led to research on lithium-air batteries, due to their ability so store more energy and thus provide longer mileage."

Indian team develops graphene-based technology for prevention of drunk driving

In April 2018, researchers at the India-based Uttarakhand Residential University, RI Instruments and Innovationin developed a graphene-based technology to prevent vehicles from operating if the driver is drunk. Now, the same team produced a prototype that will be based on graphene generated from waste products and wild grasses as one of the components.

Graphene has an important role in the device as graphene-coated electrodes can catalyze the process of oxidation of ethyl alcohol into acetic acid. The concentration of alcohol will automatically disconnect the device, the team explained. The driver, while at the driving seat, has to blow the graphene sensor on the device to start the vehicle. This will immediately activate the sensor that will analyze and estimate the liquor content present in the blood of the driver.

Directa Plus and Skanska launch trial of graphene-enhanced asphalt

Directa Plus announced the start of a trial of re-surfacing a section of a UK road in Curbridge, Oxfordshire with materials containing its G+ graphene substance. The trial will be in collaboration with Skanska, the leading Sweden-based project development and construction group. Directa Plus partnered with Iterchimica, an Italy-based leader in products that enhance asphalt performance, to carry out the trial.

For the trial, the companies will refurbish the two upper layers of a 750m-long section of road, comparing asphalt concrete containing the graphene super modifier. New technologies such as the super modifier had the potential to vastly improve the quality of road surfaces throughout Europe and the wider world, according to Directa Plus.

Tata Steel updates on graphene products development

The Tata group is a global enterprise, headquartered in India, comprising over 100 independent operating companies. Tata Steel, the flagship company of the Tata group, is a Fortune 500 Company with immense global reach. TV Narendran, Managing Director of Tata Steel, provided updates on the Company's graphene R&D business.

Tata Steel is working with graphene as part of its plan of focusing on developing advanced material to protect its margin and bottom line. Its Graphene Development Center has recently produced corrosion-resistant graphene paint and supplied graphene powder to renowned tyre companies. It has also demonstrated the potential of graphene inks, which are used in the printing of train tickets, plane boarding passes, and RFID (radio-frequency identification) tags.