Article last updated on: Jan 23, 2019

Graphene is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb-like pattern. Graphene is considered to be the world's thinnest, strongest and most conductive material - to both electricity and heat. All this properties are exciting researchers and businesses around the world - as graphene has the potential the revolutionize entire industries - in the fields of electricity, conductivity, energy generation, batteries, sensors and more.

Mechanical strength

Graphene is the world's strongest material, and so can be used to enhance the strength of other materials. Dozens of researches have demonstrated that adding even a trade amount of graphene to plastics, metals or other materials can make these materials much stronger - or lighter (as you can use less amount of material to achieve the same strength).

applications of composites image

Such graphene-enhanced composite materials can find uses in aerospace, building materials, mobile devices, and many other applications.

Thermal applications

Graphene is the world's most conductive material to heat. As graphene is also strong and light, it means that it is a great material to make heat-spreading solutions, such as heat sinks. This could be useful in both microelectronics (for example to make LED lighting more efficient and longer lasting) and also in larger applications - for example thermal foils for mobile devices.

graphene-bulb-demonstration-image



Energy storage

Because graphene is the world's thinnest material, it is also the material with the highest surface-area to volume ratio. This makes graphene a very promising material to be used in batteries and supercapacitors. Graphene may enable devices that can store more energy - and charge faster, too. Graphene can also be used to enhance fuel-cells.

Coatings ,sensors, electronics and more

Graphene has a lot of other promising applications: anti-corrosion coatings and paints, efficient and precise sensors, faster and efficient electronics, flexible displays, efficient solar panels, faster DNA sequencing, drug delivery, and more.

Graphene is such a great and basic building block that it seems that any industry can benefit from this new material. Time will tell where graphene will indeed make an impact - or whether other new materials will be more suitable.

The latest Graphene Application news:

Cryorig launches graphene-enhanced cooling system for PCs

PC gear company Cryorig has introduced its low-profile CPU graphene-enhanced cooling system for small form-factor PCs that can dissipate up to 125 W. The Cryorig C7 G is among the smallest coolers for higher-end processors available today. To make C7 G's high performance possible, Cryorig applied graphene coating on the heatsink.

Graphene-based cooler fr CPUs available by Cryorig image

As demands arise for higher-performance components, cooling designers are creating low-profile coolers rated for TDP levels of 95 W of higher. To maximize efficiency of such devices, manufacturers use copper for heatsinks, many heat pipes, and large fans. Cryorig decided to go one step further and applied graphene coating to the radiator’s fins. Thermal conductivity of graphene is considerably higher than thermal conductivity of aluminum or copper, so applying it on the fins could theoretically improve cooling performance.

Cardea Bio and Nanosens Innovations merger-acquisition finalized

Cardea Bio (formerly: Nanomedical Diagnostics) and Nanosens Innovations have joined forces to accelerate the development of the Genome Sensor: the world's first DNA search engine that runs on CRISPR-Chip technology.

Cardea has announced the finalization of their merger-acquisition of Nanosens Innovations, the creators of CRISPR-Chip. Cardea first came out with the news of the proposed merger in September, along with the announcement of their Early Access Program for the Genome Sensor. Built with CRISPR-Chip technology, the Genome Sensor is the world’s first DNA search engine. It can google genomes to detect genetic mutations and variations.

Graphene 'supercondensers' store electric charge in textile materials

Researchers at Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) have developed new devices that store electric charge in textile materials, which could be used to, for example, charge mobile phones. These are supercondensers placed on active carbon tissues that stand out due to their electric properties and high level of power.

The study focused on using textile materials as electrodes. In this case, the devices that were designed and tested make use of active carbon, graphene and polyaniline, a polymer with high capabilities that is already broadly used in textile materials.

Graphene enables fast and sensitive room-temperature nanomechanical bolometer

Scientists at the University of Oregon have designed a new method of measuring light—with the help of microscopic drums to hear light. The technology, known as a “graphene nanomechanical bolometer,” detects almost every color of light at high temperatures and high speeds.

A fast and sensitive room-temperature graphene nanomechanical bolometer image

“This tool is the fastest and most sensitive in its class,” said Benjamín Alemán, a professor of physics and a member of the University of Oregon’s Center for Optical, Molecular, and Quantum Science and an associate of the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact.

Thin graphene film quickly warms up to super high temperatures

A collaboration between three Australian universities has produced a new graphene metamaterial that could be used in solar heating. The ultrathin film also has potential to be used in desalination, for displays, or even as cloaking technology.

Graphene film holds potential for solar, desalination and display applications image

Swinburne University of Technology’s Professor Baohua Jia, who led the research, points to a few features that make the material so innovative: “The absorption is coming from the sun and then converted to heat,” she said, “So, basically, there is no external energy or electricity required.” The film heats up to 160 degrees Celsius under natural sunlight within one minute.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!