Special substrates enable large single crystal bi-/tri-layer graphene growth

Researchers of the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), in collaboration with UNIST and Sungkyunkwan University teams, have reported the fabrication and use of single crystal copper-nickel alloy foil substrates for the growth of large-area, single crystal bilayer and trilayer graphene films.

The growth of large area graphene films with a precisely controlled number of layers and stacking order can open new possibilities in electronics and photonics but remains a challenge. This study showed an example of the synthesis of bi- and trilayer graphene sheets larger than a centimeter, with layers piled up in a specific manner, namely AB- and ABA-stacking.

NanoXplore updates on graphene production facility

NanoXplore logoNanoXplore recently shared updates on its new graphene production facility in Quebec, currently housed within an existing 70,000 square foot building. The Company said that all major equipment has been delivered and secured in their physical location within the facility. Mechanical and electrical connections of the equipment are ongoing and are expected to be completed by early February.

Hydro-Québec has provided all power requirements for the commercial production of the 4,000 metric tons/year capability graphene production facility. The new graphene facility will be a fully automated production plant that will enable a connected and flexible manufacturing system. The facility will also become NanoXplore’s new Corporate Headquarters.

New method uses hydrogen plasma to smooth out wrinkles in graphene

Researchers from Nanjing University in China have developed a method to make large graphene films free of any wrinkles. The ultra-smooth films could enable large-scale production of electronic devices that harness the unique physical and chemical properties of graphene and other 2D materials.

Wrinkles  disappear when graphene is treated with a hydrogen plasma imageWrinkles in graphene films grown via chemical vapor deposition appear as jagged white lines at the top of this atomic force microscope image (left), but they disappear when the material is treated with a hydrogen plasma (right). Credit: Nature

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the best-known method for making high-quality graphene sheets. It typically involves growing graphene by pumping methane gas onto copper substrates heated to temperatures around 1,000 °C, and then transferring the graphene to another surface such as silicon. But some of the graphene sticks to the copper surface, and as the graphene and copper expand and contract at different rates, wrinkles form in the graphene sheets. Such wrinkles often present hurdles for charge carriers and lower the film’s conductivity. Other researchers have tried to reduce wrinkles using low growth temperatures or special copper substrates, but the wrinkles have proven difficult to eliminate entirely, according to Libo Gao, a physicist at Nanjing University.

Zen Graphene Solutions provides updates on its financials and plans

ZEN Graphene Solutions recently shared several updates. The first is that Zen has closed its recent private placement of flow-through common shares of the company and reports that it was oversubscribed. The company raised CAD$1.21 million (around USD$920,300) in respect of the offering, which will be used to finance the 2020 environmental baseline field program and community engagement work on the company's Albany graphite project.

In addition, the Company announced that it is moving forward with graphene production and anticipates that small-scale graphene related production will commence before the end of Q1 2020. The first batch of equipment for the purification small-scale pilot plant was already delivered. In the coming months, ZEN is aiming to setup small-scale graphite purification and graphene-related production facilities including Graphene Quantum Dots (GQDs) and Graphene Oxide (GO). These products will be available for research and development, application development and for commercial use.

Indian researchers make a discovery that may change existing graphene synthesis methods

A team of researchers at IIT-Gandhinagar in India has discovered an unexpected phenomenon that could have significant implications on the existing protocols followed to synthesize graphene and other two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials.

A popular method to synthesize graphene is liquid-phase exfoliation, in which the graphite powder is mixed in a suitable liquid medium and exposed to bursts of high-intensity sound energy (ultrasonication). This ultrasonic energy delaminates the layered parent crystals into daughter nanosheets that suspend and swim in the organic solvents to form a stable dispersion of 2D nanomaterials.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!